Posts tagged ‘sugar’

Bananas Have More Sugar Than Mars Bars

By Chad Upton

If there’s one thing Broken Secrets loves, it’s bananas. The only other subject that we’ve covered as much is the Olympics. That’s because bananas are really interesting, especially when you consider some of the previous posts:

Even if you don’t care about that stuff, they’re still really tasty. But, that flavor comes at a cost: bananas have lot of sugar in them. In fact, a cavendish banana has about 47 grams of sugar in it. To put that into perspective, a mars bar clocks in at less than 37 grams of sugar!

To be fair, bananas have a lot more nutrients than mars bars and a lot less fat t0o.

Bananas have about 6 grams of fiber, 4.7 grams of protein and of course they’re known for their potassium, although they only have about 1 gram of it. The World’s Healthiest Foods website lists bananas as the 29th food with the most potassium per serving — Swiss Chard, Lima Beans and Potatoes are the top three.

Bananas are also a very good source of vitamin B6.

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Sources: wikipedia (banana), UC South Denmark, Column Five, The World’s Healthiest Foods

November 13, 2013 at 2:00 am 3 comments

Kosher Coke Contains Real Sugar

By Chad Upton | Editor

In many countries, Coca-Cola and most other soft drinks, are sweetened with High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS). This is not real sugar from cane or beets, it is a processed sweetener made from corn that is almost identical to natural sugar.

There have been some debates and studies about whether or not HFCS is bad for us. Without getting into it, I will say that some people don’t have a problem eating HFCS and other people do.

The reasons for avoiding HFCS vary widely and one of them has led to Kosher Coke. Because high fructose corn syrup is made from corn (a grain) it cannot be consumed by (Orthodox) Ashkenazi Jews who refrain from eating grains during passover.

You can spot Kosher Coke by the yellow cap on the bottle (white in Chicago). It typically has a Kosher certification symbol and sometimes Hebrew characters. If you live near Cleveland  the local bottler never switched to HFCS, so check the ingredients — your Coke might be perma-Kosher. (more…)

March 8, 2013 at 1:00 pm 14 comments

Sugar Does Not Make Children Hyper

By Chad Upton | Editor

I’ve only been a dad for a few weeks, so I can’t provide any anecdotal evidence on this one. Thankfully, a much more scientific source is available. The British Medical Journal has published a study that concludes: sugar does not make children hyperactive.

Of course, we’ve all heard this myth. There are even some parents who give their kids pixie stix, hoping it will give them more energy: (more…)

May 7, 2012 at 7:00 pm 10 comments

The Sugar in Most Foods is Not Natural Sugar

Real sugar, from cane or beets, is expensive to import.  That’s why countries without real sugar, make it from other stuff.

The United States, Canada and the UK consume a lot of sugar and don’t have enough real sugar to meet their needs. A complicated series of transformations involving enzymes and fungi can process corn into a sugar substitute called high fructose corn syrup (known as “glucose/fructose” in Canada and “glucose fructose syrup” in the UK).

It is almost exactly like real sugar. Almost.

The safety of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is a hot debate in health circles. Food manufacturers say that it is almost exactly like real sugar and there is no proof that it is any worse for you than real sugar. Other experts point to a key difference between natural sugar (sucrose) and high fructose corn syrup. It’s very technical, but I’ll try to simplify it.

Sucrose and HFCS are both made up of glucose and fructose, which is why the food manufacturers say they’re almost the same. The key difference is that sucrose contains a bond between glucose and fructose, while HFCS does not. Because of this bond, your body must break it down before it can be utilized. In high fructose corn syrup, there is no bond — allowing it to be utilized more easily.

When you have more energy than you can burn, it gets stored as fat. A high absorption of sugar can also lead to insulin resistance and then diabetes.

Pay attention to the type of sugar in your food, it’s important. You might be surprised by how many things contain high fructose corn syrup. Some examples include: yogurt, breakfast cereals, granola bars, crackers and of course things like soda/pop and cookies. But, for all of these products, there are brands with natural sugar. Even manufacturers are starting to pay attention, Pepsi is currently offering Pepsi and Mountain “Throwback.” They’re just like their normal drinks, but made with real sugar — a throwback to the good ol’ days.

Remember that if you’re not in the USA, high fructose corn syrup is called glucose/fructose or glucose-fructose syrup.

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Sources: WP HFCS, WP Insulin, Princeton University

Photo: *MarS (cc)

January 14, 2010 at 12:04 am 3 comments


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