Posts tagged ‘trap’

U-Shaped Plumbing Stops Sewer Gases

Look under any sink, shower or bathtub in your home and you’ll find a U shaped plumbing arrangement. This plumbing configuration may go by the following names: p-trap, j-trap, u-trap or s-trap. Depending on how you look at it, it can look like any of these letters.

Technically, the term “s-trap” describes a slightly older variation of this plumbing technique, but the term is often used to describe the one seen below. For short, we’ll just call it “the trap” because it traps water.

Trapping water serves two main purposes.

The first is prevent sewer gases from entering a building through the drain pipes. These gases smell bad and are bad for your health.

The second is to catch small items that are inadvertently dropped down the drain, such as jewelry. There is typically an access cap on the bottom of the trap that can be used to retreive valuables or clean out the trap — they tend to collect hair and other debris.

When water enters the trap, it pushes the same amount of water out the other side of the trap. This means the trap will always maintain the same amount of water in it. Traps may dry out due to evaporation if a particular drain is not frequently used. If you have a rarely used drain, it might be a good idea to run the water for a minute every 4-5 weeks.

Broken Secrets | By: Chad Upton

Secrets on: Facebook | Twitter | Kindle

Donate 15 minutes to help someone else

Sources: Wikipedia, Water Evaporation

May 26, 2010 at 5:00 am 3 comments

Roadway Marks Used For Speeding Tickets

Look at the two white marks highlighted in the photo below.

Radar is not always the best way to catch speeders, especially in open areas where the police can’t hide.

But, radar isn’t the only option, Police can also use these marks to measure how fast you’re going. This pair of marks will be followed by a second pair further down the highway. In the United States, they’re usually a quarter mile apart and in Canada, 500 meters.

An officer in an airplane or unmarked car will use a stopwatch to time your car between the two pairs of marks. The time it takes will give them your average speed between those two markers, and if it’s high enough then they can write you a ticket. In the case of aerial surveillance, the plane will notify police cars waiting on the ground.

Either way, I’d recommend a good radar detector (where legal of course).

BrokenSecrets.com

Sources: AOL, Nashville.gov, City of Ottawa

Photo: dougtone (creative commons)

January 12, 2010 at 12:40 am 4 comments


Follow Broken Secrets

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 5,435 other followers

Big Awards


Best Personal Blog/Website (People's Voice)


W3 Award - Copy Writing

Categories

Featured by…

• Yahoo
• Business Insider
• NPR
• BBC
• Smithsonian Magazine
• USA Today
• AskMen (and many more...)

Contact Info


%d bloggers like this: